Homepage Forums Economic Forums The Tax on Tax – a minor/major issue if FF works in US?

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  • #776
    BreakableBreakable
    Keymaster

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XX8EswfGKQw
    Is this not an issue? Imagine someone uses IRS to choke LPP – there is no way to win…

    #6175
    AvatarAeronaut
    Member

    There are all sorts of ways to win. Just no easy ways. The system works that way for any non-mainstream idea. But the IRS can be challenged in court. And you can lessen the chances of taking the government to court by gaining powerful political allies in all states. This especially includes business leaders with a vested interest in cheap clean energy.

    I’m a lot more concerned with the politics of getting the NRC to even begin looking into creating a licensing category for DPF-based Aneutronic Fusion. I’ve already looked into several ways that it’s in Big Oil’s best interests to be an early mover, but I expect the mining lobby to provide the most resistance. Maybe the 2 can balance each other?

    #6177
    BreakableBreakable
    Keymaster

    NCR is not a problem if you do the same Hyperion did – just sell it outside US. I would be more concerned with IRS. The only workaround in this case would be if someone worked on FF outside of US in a parallel manner.

    #6183
    AvatarAeronaut
    Member

    Breakable wrote: NCR is not a problem if you do the same Hyperion did – just sell it outside US. I would be more concerned with IRS. The only workaround in this case would be if someone worked on FF outside of US in a parallel manner.

    If you’re subject to IRS, you’re subject to NRC. But NRC has cousins in all over the developed world. This is just one more of Hyperion’s challenges, btw.

    #6190
    BreakableBreakable
    Keymaster

    The key here is “developed” world. Would somebody have the same problems in Peru for example?

    #6197
    AvatarAeronaut
    Member

    Breakable wrote: The key here is “developed” world. Would somebody have the same problems in Peru for example?

    Be expecting a political dogfight (understatement) to be more challenging than the scientific challenges. And the faster you want to move, the more vicious its likely to be. The best way to head that off is to educate everybody in the developed and developing worlds that there’s more money to be made by aggressively embracing FF than opposing it. Even the undeveloped nations, since they run the UN in terms of numbers and sob stories.

    The biggest challenge I see, therefore, is finding new uses for coal, given that they can be one of the first industries with virtually free energy if they desire, and an adoption gradient of at least a decade, no matter how many FFs are cranked out every year. (The various supply, tooling, training, and regulatory chains will impose a limit below what can actually be produced in the early years.)

    The first thing that comes to mind is coal gasification, along with reduced mining and transportation costs protecting the profitability of their dwindling traditional market. Another is the PR windfall of cleaning up their safety record by seeding new industries based on virtually free energy. Say desalination and the ability to mine the sea, so to speak.

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