Homepage Forums Lawrenceville Plasma Physics Experiment (LPPX) Regulation of electric power production

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  • #408

    It is not clear to me if focus fusion reactors could be regulated to adapt to changes in the intensity of daily electric power consumption, from periods of low or normal, “standard” consumption, that is the level needed to supply current industrial consumption, to periods of “high” or “peak” consumption, which results from the sum of standard consumption plus the daily maximums of domestic and non-industrial consumption. It is known that current, i.e. fission nuclear reactors are only able to supply for periods of low and standard consumption, but incapable to supply for high and peak consumption.
    Would focus fusion reactors be able to adapt to this daily differences, and, in case of a negative response, can focus fusion reactors be connected to some energy storage system to adjust to this changes, v.g. with connection to an small, local hydroelectic plant as some current nuclear plants in Europe do?
    This questions are of great importance to the prospects to replace almost ALL currents form of energy supply, including hidroelectric power, with fusion.

    #2040
    AvatarDaveMart
    Member

    Focus fusion should be hugely switchable – nothing to heat up or cool down, no building up to any critical level, not even any boilers to heat up.
    Should be power at the flick of a switch, and so cheap that it would not maake any sense to store energy, save in the form of perhaps hydrogen conversion for use as a fuel.
    Regards,
    DaveMart

    #2041
    AvatarJolly Roger
    Member

    DaveMart wrote: Focus fusion should be hugely switchable – nothing to heat up or cool down, no building up to any critical level, not even any boilers to heat up.
    Should be power at the flick of a switch.

    I agree. According to info on the Focus Fusion site:
    https://focusfusion.org/index.php/site/article/focus_fusion_reactor/
    fusion energy is initiated by a pulse of electricity lasting a few milliseconds. The pulse can be repeated (switched on) several hundred or several thousand times per second. The amount of energy produced per second is proportional to the number of electrical pulses per second, which is completely controllable, within certain limits. Other controllable factors involved are the charge size of the electric pulse, the fill gas pressure and fusible ratio of the fill gas.

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