Homepage Forums General Transition Issues Lets prepare for FF investment

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  • #6136
    Avatarhercdriver
    Member

    A more successful approach to introducing FF generators into the grid might be to start with smaller municipalities and remote sites which will demonstrate reliability and lack of expense. Getting the Dept Of Defense on board will also jump start the project as they provide a major funding source. Once they prove capable, you can start building to provide for increased energy demand (new coal/nuke/gas plants become defunct). This allows the current sources to be phased out over a period of 25-50 years and provides a safety net in the case of problems with FF in the near future. If FF plants show aptitude at producing energy on demand then they also have a place immediately as spinning reserves in the current power grid allowing less waste from the fossil fuel plants (which would quickly lower operating and thus end user costs). All in all a stepped and measured approach at introduction and eventual domination seems to make the most sense to me.

    #6137
    AvatarAeronaut
    Member

    hercdriver wrote: A more successful approach to introducing FF generators into the grid might be to start with smaller municipalities and remote sites which will demonstrate reliability and lack of expense. Getting the Dept Of Defense on board will also jump start the project as they provide a major funding source. Once they prove capable, you can start building to provide for increased energy demand (new coal/nuke/gas plants become defunct). This allows the current sources to be phased out over a period of 25-50 years and provides a safety net in the case of problems with FF in the near future. If FF plants show aptitude at producing energy on demand then they also have a place immediately as spinning reserves in the current power grid allowing less waste from the fossil fuel plants (which would quickly lower operating and thus end user costs). All in all a stepped and measured approach at introduction and eventual domination seems to make the most sense to me.

    I like the government buildings approach, rippling out from around 2,500 experimentally-licensed reactors in local colleges and universities, then moving into state and local government buildings as the licensees start delivering FFs to dealers. Right now we seem to be looking at this like a 1940 job shop production model. By 1945, airplanes really were mass produced and had truly interchangeable parts.

    Next we target all those diesel powered standby generators so that nobody expects 5MW 24/7/~360, but they’re dang sure wondering if 2 units would give them 24/7/365, and are probably experimenting with powering non-critical circuits like warehouse and parking lot lighting, possibly HVAC, etc.

    The locomotive fleet is another easy place to find isolated testbeds, and the shipbuilders would be following these tests very closely.

    The very worse thing we can do is allow ourselves to complacently accept as “fact” that widespread FF adoption has to take more than 5 years to accomplish. It may well play out that way, but that could likely be chalked up to a lack of leadership.

    #6138
    BreakableBreakable
    Keymaster

    I would compare it to the PC industry:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ANA7sLB8xA
    It took about 30 years to evolve, even when everyone now knows that it provides an enormous competitive advantage.

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