Possibly new type of neutron shielding that may of benefit under commercialisation
Posted: 21 February 2013 08:45 AM   [ Ignore ]
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http://www.theengineer.co.uk/sectors/aerospace/news/solid-hydrogen-fuel-could-help-shield-satellites-from-radiation/1015613.article

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Posted: 21 February 2013 10:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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annodomini2 - 21 February 2013 08:45 AM

http://www.theengineer.co.uk/sectors/aerospace/news/solid-hydrogen-fuel-could-help-shield-satellites-from-radiation/1015613.article

Well, aneutronic reactions such as pB11 need relatively little neutron shielding so this wouldn’t be much of a game changer for FF units.

If FF works then the shielding needed would be about a meter thickness of water or polyethylene backed by a few centimeters of lead. This type of shielding would be quite cheap and could fit in power stations, mobile generators, ships, subs, trains, larger ground transports and larger subsonic air transports.

So the cost of a new type of hydrogen-based shielding even if it was, say, 40% more efficient would only be justified if it allowed FF units to fit into some application they could not otherwise fit into.

 

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Posted: 21 February 2013 12:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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zapkitty - 21 February 2013 10:01 AM
annodomini2 - 21 February 2013 08:45 AM

http://www.theengineer.co.uk/sectors/aerospace/news/solid-hydrogen-fuel-could-help-shield-satellites-from-radiation/1015613.article

Well, aneutronic reactions such as pB11 need relatively little neutron shielding so this wouldn’t be much of a game changer for FF units.

If FF works then the shielding needed would be about a meter thickness of water or polyethylene backed by a few centimeters of lead. This type of shielding would be quite cheap and could fit in power stations, mobile generators, ships, subs, trains, larger ground transports and larger subsonic air transports.

So the cost of a new type of hydrogen-based shielding even if it was, say, 40% more efficient would only be justified if it allowed FF units to fit into some application they could not otherwise fit into.

It looks like the benefit here for this new tech is entirely in mass reduction anyways, so it’s really only beneficial for satellites.

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Posted: 22 February 2013 05:35 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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But if an FF is light enough they may want it for Aircraft, they already have electric turbines.

This may offer shielding for use in aircraft.

Additionally, some uses may require portable units, reducing their weight may also be beneficial.

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